UIHistories Project: A History of the University of Illinois by Kalev Leetaru
N A V I G A T I O N D I G I T A L L I B R A R Y
Bookmark and Share



Repository: UIHistories Project: Book - Overview of University of Illinois for Chicago Alumni (1926) [PAGE 48]

Caption: Book - Overview of University of Illinois for Chicago Alumni (1926)
This is a reduced-resolution page image for fast online browsing.


Jump to Page:
< Previous Page [Displaying Page 48 of 63] Next Page >
[VIEW ALL PAGE THUMBNAILS]




EXTRACTED TEXT FROM PAGE:



98

DIRECTORY OF ILLINOIS MEN

IN CHICAGO AND VICINITY

99

HARRY GILL-MAKER OF CHAMPIONS

There are six university relays on the program of the Drake relay meet. This year University of Illinois relay teams flashed to victory in three of these six races-—the quarter-mile, halfmile and medley relays—and placed second in the four-mile and third in the one-mile. No other conference team won a relay event. Illinois' 1926 relay campaign opened at the University of Texas with a victory in the half-mile and continued at the Rice Institute races at Houston, Texas, where the Illini runners took the quarter-mile, half-mile, and medley relays. At Kansas Gill's athletes were victors in the four-mile relay and at Ohio on the same day they won the distance medley. In all these games the Illinois acquitted themselves well in the individual events. Illinois competed in two dual meets during the indoor season, defeating Notre Dame and Iowa and placed fourth in the indoor conference championships, six points behind the leaders. Outdoors, the team has decisively defeated Notre Dame and Ohio Wesleyan, in its sole meet. Thus, the track team of 1926 maintained the victorious tradition of Illinois track athletics. It is not a squad of brilliant stars, but rather of fine-spirited, hard-working athletes, who are being developed to their best possibilities by their coach, Harry L. Gill. It is very doubtful if the record of continued success by Illinois teams under Coach Gill since he came to Illinois in 19 04 can be equalled by any other coach in any branch of athletics. This is not merely a partisan opinion, but it is held by most critics who have studied the amazing list of victories achieved and records established by the Illini teams under Mr. Gill. In 22 years they have won 92 dual meets, lost 16, and tied two. The climax of success was reached in 1924 when Illinois athletes who had been trained by Harry Gill scored 35 points in the Olympic games at Paris—more points than those made by any other university—more than twice as many as Harvard, Yale and Princeton combined, and nearly twice as many as the total scoring of all the rest of the Big Ten universities. "Beyond a doubt the greatest track and field team ever gotten together at any college" is the way "Ted" Meredith, famous Pennsylvania track star, described the 1924 Illinois track team. And he was joined in this sentiment by sport writers all over the country. Grantland Rice in the New York HeraldTribune said that it was one of the greatest track teams ever developed in the history of athletics. James Weber Linn in the Chicago Herald-Examiner said, "Illinois has the strongest allaround team that has ever been known in the West and probably in the country. I suspect she could take on Harvard, Yale and Princeton and defeat them single handed." The 1924 team defeated Michigan, 106 to 29, and won the conference with 74 points, nearly twice as many as the nearest competitor. Most of the athletes who have carried the Orange and Blue colors to these perennial victories have had no exceptional prom-